GERD Articles A-Z

Aciphex - Calcium Carbonate

This page contains links to eMedTV GERD Articles containing information on subjects from Aciphex to Calcium Carbonate. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Aciphex
    Aciphex is a medication that decreases the amount of acid in the stomach. As this eMedTV article explains, it is used to treat GERD, duodenal ulcers, and other conditions. This resource takes an in-depth look at Aciphex and its uses.
  • Aciphex and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, if your doctor recommends breastfeeding while taking Aciphex, be sure to watch for any signs of problems or unusual changes in your baby. This article also stresses discussing the issue with your doctor.
  • Aciphex and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, the FDA considers Aciphex (rabeprazole) a pregnancy Category B drug, meaning it's generally considered safe for women who are expecting. This article takes a closer look at the safety of taking this product during pregnancy.
  • Aciphex Dosing
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended Aciphex dosage for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms is 20 mg once a day for four weeks. This page talks about the dosing of Aciphex for treatment of several medical conditions.
  • Aciphex Drug Interactions
    Digoxin and ketoconazole are two medications that may cause drug interactions with Aciphex. This portion of the eMedTV library describes these and other possible reactions that people should be aware of while taking Aciphex.
  • Aciphex Generic
    You can now buy one version of Aciphex (rabeprazole sodium) in generic form. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at the generic version, with details on how it compares to brand-name Aciphex, who makes it, and more.
  • Aciphex Medication
    This eMedTV resource provides information on Aciphex, a medication prescribed to treat various conditions, such as GERD and duodenal ulcers. This page gives a brief overview of possible side effects and what your doctor needs to know.
  • Aciphex Overdose
    In animal studies, very large doses of Aciphex led to coma, watery diarrhea, and other symptoms. This eMedTV Web page offers more details on what you can expect from an overdose of Aciphex, including information on treatment options.
  • Aciphex Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV resource includes Aciphex precautions and warnings that people who are taking Aciphex should be aware of. For example, if you have liver disease, your doctor may use caution when treating you with Aciphex.
  • Aciphex Side Effects
    Common Aciphex side effects include headache, sore throat, and diarrhea. This part of the eMedTV archives talks about possible side effects of Aciphex. However, it is important to note that not everyone will experience Aciphex side effects.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle
    Aciphex Sprinkle is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of GERD. This eMedTV Web selection contains more details on this medication, with information on how it works, when and how to take it, and side effects that may occur.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle and Breastfeeding
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, it may be advisable to avoid using Aciphex Sprinkle (rabeprazole sprinkle) while breastfeeding. This article discusses whether the drug passes through breast milk and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Aciphex Sprinkle (rabeprazole sprinkle) is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This page explores this topic in more detail, including animal research that has been done and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the Aciphex Sprinkle dose you receive will be based on several factors, such as your weight and your response to the drug. This page covers how this drug is taken and offers tips on how to get the most out of each dose.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to take certain supplements, medications, or other products with Aciphex Sprinkle. This eMedTV page examines how drug interactions with Aciphex Sprinkle can cause serious side effects. It also discusses how to avoid these problems.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Medication Information
    This eMedTV page explains that before you can take Aciphex Sprinkle, your doctor will need information on your medical history and other medications you are taking. More details are covered, such as how the drug is taken and what it is used for.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Overdose
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses how an overdose of Aciphex Sprinkle (rabeprazole sprinkle) may cause potentially serious problems. This article outlines possible effects of an overdose and explains how these symptoms may be treated.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, possible Aciphex Sprinkle side effects include nausea, stomach pain, and headaches. This article provides a more in-depth list of reactions to this prescription drug, including those that require prompt treatment.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Uses
    Aciphex Sprinkle is approved to treat GERD in children ages 1 to 11 years old. This eMedTV Web page presents more details on what Aciphex Sprinkle is used for, with information on how it works, whether it has off-label (unapproved) uses, and more.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Warnings and Precautions
    Some people may have a higher risk for complications like severe diarrhea while taking Aciphex Sprinkle. This eMedTV segment explores safety precautions to be aware of with Aciphex Sprinkle, including warnings for people who have certain medical issues.
  • Acivex
    Aciphex is a medicine licensed to treat conditions within the stomach, intestines, and esophagus. This eMedTV segment further explains what Aciphex is used for and lists potential side effects of the drug. Acivex is a common misspelling of Aciphex.
  • Additional Tests for GERD
    Additional tests can be used to diagnose GERD, which this interactive video clip describes.
  • All Symptoms of GERD
    Chest pain and sore throat are common symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This eMedTV Web page discusses how all symptoms of GERD should be taken seriously. This page also links to an article with more information on the topic.
  • Anacid
    Antacids are drugs used to relieve symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, and other conditions. This eMedTV article describes this class of drugs in more detail and lists the four main types of antacids. Anacid is a common misspelling of antacids.
  • Antacide
    Antacids are medications used to relieve symptoms of heartburn and acid indigestion. This eMedTV resource lists the various types of antacids available and also explores the risks of using these drugs. Antacide is a common misspelling of antacids.
  • Antacids
    Antacids are drugs that can quickly reduce heartburn symptoms by increasing the pH balance in your stomach. This eMedTV Web page describes the four different types of antacids and includes information on how they work and who should take them.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract
    People may use artichoke leaf extract because it supposedly lowers cholesterol and treats other conditions. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this extract, including information on its safety, benefits, effectiveness, and more.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract and Breastfeeding
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that it is not known if artichoke leaf extract passes through breast milk. This page also discusses what you should know if you are taking artichoke leaf extract and breastfeeding at the same time.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract and Pregnancy
    Women who are pregnant should probably avoid artichoke leaf extract. As this eMedTV Web page explains, clinical studies have not been done on artichoke leaf extract and pregnancy, so it is not known if this herbal remedy is safe for pregnant women.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that although there are no established artichoke leaf extract dosing guidelines, some studies have used certain doses for treating various conditions. This page offers more information about artichoke leaf extract dosages.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract Drug Interactions
    It is not currently known if any other drugs will cause interactions with artichoke leaf extract. This eMedTV page explains what to do to avoid possible artichoke leaf extract drug interactions and what to tell your doctor before taking the supplement.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract Overdose
    An artichoke leaf extract overdose may cause gas, gallstones, or other gallbladder problems. This eMedTV page explains what to do if you think you have taken too much artichoke leaf extract and describes possible treatment options that are available.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract Side Effects
    For people taking artichoke leaf extract, side effects may include gas and allergic reactions. This eMedTV segment describes other possible side effects of artichoke leaf extract, including those that should be reported to your doctor right away.
  • Artichoke Leaf Extract Supplement
    Heartburn, IBS, and even hangovers can supposedly be treated with artichoke leaf extract. This eMedTV resource describes this supplement in some detail, with information on its active ingredients, what it is used for, and important safety concerns.
  • Asiphex
    Aciphex is often used for treating conditions affecting the stomach, intestines, and esophagus. This eMedTV Web page discusses specific Aciphex uses and describes the effects of the medicine. Asiphex is a common misspelling of Aciphex.
  • Axcid
    Axid is a drug used to treat GERD, duodenal ulcers, and gastric ulcers, among other conditions. This page on the eMedTV site also discusses what to tell your doctor before you take Axid. Axcid is a common misspelling of Axid.
  • Axed
    Axid is a medication used to treat GERD and gastric ulcers, among other conditions. This eMedTV page explains how this medicine works and lists some of the side effects and possible symptoms of an overdose. Axed is a common misspelling of Axid.
  • Axid
    Axid is a drug commonly used to treat duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and GERD. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed overview of Axid (which is available both by prescription and over-the-counter) and links to more information.
  • Axid Alternatives
    Axid alternatives may include other drugs, surgery, or lifestyle changes. This eMedTV page further describes these alternatives to Axid, noting in particular some other drugs used to treat conditions related to the esophagus, stomach, and intestines.
  • Axid and Breastfeeding
    Doctors often advise their patients that it is okay to breastfeed while taking Axid. This eMedTV segment explores Axid and breastfeeding, noting in particular some situations in which a doctor may prescribe Axid to a woman who is breastfeeding.
  • Axid and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Axid and pregnancy have not been tested together in humans, so the drug's full effects on an unborn child are unknown. A pregnant woman may take Axid if its benefits outweigh the risks to her unborn child.
  • Axid Dosage
    Most people start with an Axid dosage of 150 mg twice daily for the treatment of GERD. This section of the eMedTV library also offers Axid dosing suggestions for the treatment of ulcers, heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach.
  • Axid Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page contains information on Axid, a drug used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions. Topics discussed in this article include how it works, when to take it, and more.
  • Axid Drug Interactions
    When medicines such as aspirin or atazanavir are taken with Axid, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment lists other medications that may lead to drug interactions with Axid and explains the possible consequences.
  • Axid Overdose
    Watery eyes and diarrhea are among the symptoms of an Axid overdose. This page on the eMedTV site also lists possible treatment options for an overdose on Axid, such as pumping the stomach, administering certain drugs, and supportive care.
  • Axid Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects with Axid can potentially include impotence and a decreased sex drive. This section of the eMedTV library provides information about how often these Axid sexual side effects may occur.
  • Axid Uses
    Axid is used for treating gastric ulcers, duodenal ulcers, and GERD. As this eMedTV segment explains, over-the-counter Axid is also used to treat heartburn, acid indigestion, and sour stomach. This article also lists some off-label Axid uses.
  • Axid Warnings and Precautions
    You shouldn't take Axid if you are allergic to any of the components used to make it. This eMedTV Web page offers other Axid warnings and precautions, including what to tell your doctor before taking Axid and people who shouldn't take the drug at all.
  • Benefits of Artichoke Leaf Extract
    There is some evidence that artichoke leaf extract may be beneficial for treating some health conditions. This eMedTV article describes several of these artichoke leaf extract benefits and explains how the herbal supplement may work.
  • Benefits of Curcumin
    As this eMedTV resource explains, curcumin may provide a variety of health benefits, such as treating or preventing certain medical conditions, including high cholesterol and cancer. This page also explains how curcumin works and its use in children.
  • Benefits of Licorice
    Licorice is supposedly useful in treating several health conditions, such as ulcers and high cholesterol. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other benefits of licorice, including information on how licorice works and if it is safe for children.
  • Benefits of Neem
    Neem is claimed to be beneficial for treating skin ulcers, diabetes, and cough. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists other potential benefits of neem and explains how the supplement may work for these various conditions.
  • Benefits of Tumeric
    Using turmeric medicinally may have several health benefits, such as treating depression and headaches. This eMedTV page explores other possible benefits of turmeric. Benefits of tumeric is a common misspelling of benefits of turmeric.
  • Benefits of Turmeric Information
    Turmeric is claimed to be useful for depression, headaches, and indigestion. This page of the eMedTV Web site further explores these and other benefits of turmeric, discusses the effectiveness of this spice, and explains whether it is safe for children.
  • Calcium Carbonate
    Calcium carbonate is used as both an antacid and as a calcium supplement. This page from the eMedTV library further explains what calcium carbonate is used for, describes how it works for these uses, and lists some of the side effects that may occur.
  • Calcuim Carbonate
    Calcium carbonate is a popular dietary supplement that can also be used as an antacid. This eMedTV page explains how calcium carbonate works and offers general warnings for this product. Calcuim carbonate is a common misspelling of calcium carbonate.
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