GERD Articles A-Z

Causes of GERD - Famotidine

This page contains links to eMedTV GERD Articles containing information on subjects from Causes of GERD to Famotidine. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Causes of GERD
    The specific causes of GERD are still being investigated. As this eMedTV article explains, however, several factors can put you at a higher risk of developing it. These risk factors include pregnancy, certain medications, and alcohol or tobacco use.
  • Celexa Interaction With Prilosec
    Combining Celexa and Prilosec may cause a drug interaction, possibly increasing your risk of side effects. This eMedTV article discusses this Celexa interaction with Prilosec in more detail, explaining what to do if you take these two drugs together.
  • Cemitidine
    Cimetidine is a drug licensed to treat heartburn, GERD, and similar conditions. This eMedTV article lists the other conditions that can be treated with cimetidine and explains how the medication works. Cemitidine is a common misspelling of cimetidine.
  • Changing What You Eat (GERD Treatment)
    This video clip explains how changing what you eat may help relieve your GERD symptoms.
  • Cimedidin
    Cimetidine is a drug available by prescription and over-the-counter to treat GERD and other conditions. This eMedTV page covers other cimetidine uses and lists potential side effects of the drug. Cimedidin is a common misspelling of cimetidine.
  • Cimedidine
    Cimetidine is a drug used for treating heartburn, ulcers, indigestion, and other conditions. This eMedTV page lists other approved cimetidine uses and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Cimedidine is a common misspelling of cimetidine.
  • Cimetadine
    Cimetidine is a drug used to treat gastric ulcers, heartburn, and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page features a brief description of cimetidine and provides a link to more information. Cimetadine is a common misspelling of cimetidine.
  • Cimetidin
    Cimetidine is a medicine approved to treat conditions related to the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This eMedTV page lists other effects of the drug and describes possible cimetidine side effects. Cimetidin is a common misspelling of cimetidine.
  • Cimetidine
    Cimetidine is a drug that reduces acid production in the stomach. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at cimetidine, including information about conditions it is used to treat, side effects of the drug, and tips for how to take it.
  • Cimetidine (Tagamet)
    As this eMedTV page explains, Tagamet is no longer available, but cimetidine (the active ingredient) is found in several generic products. This segment provides a brief overview of this H2 blocker, with a link to a detailed article on this topic.
  • Cimetidine Alternatives
    Alternatives to cimetidine may include medications such as Zantac, Prilosec, or Pepcid. This portion of the eMedTV Web site discusses possible cimetidine alternatives, such as lifestyle changes, other medications, and even surgery (in extreme cases).
  • Cimetidine and Breastfeeding
    Cimetidine has been shown to pass through breast milk. This eMedTV article discusses cimetidine and breastfeeding, including information about some factors doctors may consider before recommending cimetidine for women who breastfeed their baby.
  • Cimetidine and Gynecomastia
    Gynecomastia (abnormal breast development and enlargement in men) is a possible side effect of cimetidine. This eMedTV article discusses cimetidine and gynecomastia, including information about other possible causes of the condition.
  • Cimetidine and Impotence
    Some men have reported experiencing impotence while taking cimetidine. As explained in this eMedTV resource, most cases of impotence with cimetidine occurred in men taking large doses of the drug. This article discusses cimetidine and impotence.
  • Cimetidine and Pregnancy
    Cimetidine is generally considered safe to take during pregnancy. This selection from the eMedTV archives includes a discussion of cimetidine and pregnancy, including details concerning how the FDA has classified the drug.
  • Cimetidine Dosing
    Cimetidine dosing guidelines for treating duodenal ulcers usually call for taking a daily dose of 800 mg. This eMedTV resource explores cimetidine dosages used to treat several conditions, such as gastric ulcers and heartburn.
  • Cimetidine Overdose
    Symptoms associated with a cimetidine overdose may include rapid heart rate and trouble breathing. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible effects of an overdose with cimetidine and describes treatment options for overdoses.
  • Cimetidine Side Effects
    In studies of cimetidine, side effects included headaches, diarrhea, and dizziness, among others. This eMedTV resource discusses common and rare problems seen with this drug, including those that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Cimetidine vs. Zantac
    Although cimetidine and Zantac belong to the same class of drugs, they are not exactly the same. This eMedTV segment looks at cimetidine vs. Zantac and discusses the similarities and differences between these two drugs.
  • Citotec
    Cytotec is prescribed for the prevention of stomach ulcers in people taking certain pain relievers. This eMedTV resource takes a look at this prescription drug, including specific uses and dosing instructions. Citotec is a common misspelling of Cytotec.
  • Curcumin
    Curcumin supposedly has several medicinal benefits, such as helping with high cholesterol and cancer. This eMedTV page offers an overview of curcumin, including how it may treat several health conditions, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Curcumin and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that no studies have been done on curcumin and breastfeeding, so it is not known if it is safe to take curcumin while nursing. This page also discusses why women may want to avoid curcumin supplements while breastfeeding.
  • Curcumin and Pregnancy
    Pregnant women should probably not consume curcumin supplements. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explores curcumin and pregnancy in more detail, explaining why it is generally recommended for pregnant women to avoid curcumin supplements.
  • Curcumin Capsules
    This eMedTV segment looks at curcumin capsules. Information discussed includes what they can treat, if they are safe, dosing instructions, interactions, and side effects.
  • Curcumin Dosage
    There are no clearly established dosing guidelines for curcumin, as research is still in the early stages. This eMedTV article describes the dosages that were used in some studies and explains how to choose a supplement that is right for you.
  • Curcumin Drug Interactions
    Theoretically, curcumin may interact with certain medications, such as aspirin, NSAIDs, or warfarin. This eMedTV page explains that there are no documented curcumin drug interactions, but this product could interact with other "blood-thinners."
  • Curcumin Overdose
    It is not exactly known what to expect from an overdose on curcumin. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the factors that may affect a curcumin overdose (such as how much was consumed) and discusses the possible treatment options.
  • Curcumin Side Effects
    Nausea and diarrhea are among the possible side effects of curcumin. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that some side effects of the supplement can also be more serious and may require medical attention, such as any signs of bleeding.
  • Curcumine
    Curcumin may be useful for preventing and treating numerous medical conditions, including cancer. This eMedTV article explores the benefits of curcumin and lists some of its potential side effects. Curcumine is a common misspelling of curcumin.
  • Curcummin
    Curcumin is claimed to be useful for many medical conditions, including high cholesterol and cancer. This eMedTV segment explains the effects of curcumin and also offers precautions for using the product. Curcummin is a common misspelling of curcumin.
  • Cytotec
    Cytotec is licensed to prevent stomach ulcers in people who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This eMedTV Web page contains an overview of this medicine, including how it works, side effects, dosing instructions, and more.
  • Cytotec 100 Mcg Tablet
    If you develop intolerable side effects while taking Cytotec 200 mcg, you may need a lower dosage. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at when a doctor may prescribe Cytotec 100 mcg tablets. A link to more details on this drug is also included.
  • Cytotec 200 Mcg
    The recommended dosage of Cytotec is 200 mcg taken four times daily. As explained in this eMedTV page, your amount may be lowered if you develop intolerable side effects. A link to more information on dosing instructions is also provided.
  • Cytotec Abortion
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Cytotec to certain women who want to terminate a pregnancy. This eMedTV article offers a brief description on when Cytotec is used to cause an abortion and provides a link to more details on uses of the drug.
  • Cytotec and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Cytotec (misoprostol) passes through breast milk and might cause side effects in a nursing infant. This article provides a closer look at why taking Cytotec while breastfeeding may not be safe in some cases.
  • Cytotec and Pregnancy
    A woman should not take Cytotec (misoprostol) if she is pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant. As this eMedTV page explains, women must have a pregnancy test before they take this drug and use an effective form of birth control during treatment.
  • Cytotec Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, your Cytotec dose will depend on how you respond to this medication. This page discusses how your doctor will determine if you need a lower dosage and lists tips on how to avoid certain side effects.
  • Cytotec Drug Information
    Cytotec can prevent stomach ulcers in people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, as this eMedTV page explains, your doctor needs information on your medical issues and other drugs you are taking to ensure safe treatment.
  • Cytotec Drug Interactions
    Taking certain antacids or receiving oxytocin while taking Cytotec may lead to drug interactions. This eMedTV page explores what may happen when Cytotec is combined with products such as these and discusses how to reduce your risk for problems.
  • Cytotec Drug Uses
    Adults who are taking certain pain relievers and have a risk for ulcers may use Cytotec. This eMedTV segment discusses more specific reasons this drug may be recommended, as well as how it works. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Cytotec for Induction of Labor
    Women who must have a labor induction may receive Cytotec to help cause uterine contractions. This eMedTV article explains, however, that this is considered an "off-label" (unapproved) use for the drug and may cause dangerous complications in some women.
  • Cytotec Heavy Bleeding
    If you use Cytotec to induce labor or end a pregnancy, you may have an increased risk for heavy bleeding. This eMedTV page explains how heavy bleeding following Cytotec use may indicate a tear in the lining of the uterus, which can cause complications.
  • Cytotec Indications
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, Cytotec is a prescription medication used to prevent stomach ulcers in adults taking certain pain relievers. This page takes a closer look at Cytotec indications, including possible "off-label" (unapproved) uses.
  • Cytotec Information
    If you are taking certain pain relievers and are at risk for ulcers, your doctor may prescribe Cytotec. This eMedTV page contains more information on Cytotec, including how it works, side effects, and dosing tips. A link to more details is also included.
  • Cytotec Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Cytotec to prevent ulcers in adults taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This eMedTV resource explores Cytotec, with information on how this medication works, when to take it, and how to avoid potential side effects.
  • Cytotec Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, overdosing on Cytotec (misoprostol) may cause low blood pressure, difficulty breathing, or diarrhea. A description of other overdose symptoms and treatment options are also covered in this article.
  • Cytotec Side Effects
    Abdominal (stomach) pain and diarrhea are the most commonly reported Cytotec side effects. This eMedTV segment describes other reactions that occurred during clinical trials, with detailed lists of common, rare, and potentially serious problems.
  • Cytotec Uses
    This eMedTV page explains why Cytotec is prescribed to prevent stomach ulcers in certain adults who are using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This page offers a description of what Cytotec is used for and when it may be given for off-label uses.
  • Cytotec Vaginal Use
    When used vaginally, Cytotec can help stimulate contractions to induce labor or cause an abortion. This eMedTV resource further explores this "off-label" (unapproved) use for Cytotec and provides a link to learn more about the uses for this drug.
  • Cytotec Warnings and Precautions
    Pregnant women and people with certain allergies should not take Cytotec. Precautions and warnings listed in this eMedTV article also apply to people with heart disease and other problems. This page also covers what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Cytotek
    Cytotec is a drug licensed to prevent stomach ulcers in people taking certain pain relievers. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Cytotek is a common misspelling of Cytotec.
  • Dealing With GERD
    This eMedTV article explains that if you are dealing with GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease), you should be aware of your treatment options. Lifestyle changes, medication, and surgery are effective ways of improving your symptoms of GERD.
  • Dexilant
    Dexilant is a prescription medicine used to decrease stomach acid. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on what it is used to treat, how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Dexilant and Breastfeeding
    No human or animal studies have explored whether Dexilant passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page further explores breastfeeding and Dexilant, including details on why the manufacturer of the drug does not recommend it for women who are nursing.
  • Dexilant and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV article explains, animal studies on pregnancy and Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) suggest that the drug is probably safe for pregnant women. This page describes the results of animal studies that were done on this pregnancy Category B medicine.
  • Dexilant Dosage
    Dexilant capsules are taken once a day to treat conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This eMedTV page takes a closer look at specific dosing guidelines for Dexilant, as well as tips for getting the most out of each dosage.
  • Dexilant Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, iron, and digoxin are some of the products that can cause Dexilant drug interactions. This eMedTV Web resource outlines other medications that can cause negative reactions with Dexilant and describes the problems these combinations can cause.
  • Dexilant Medication Information
    Dexilant is a drug prescribed to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and erosive esophagitis. This eMedTV Web article provides information on the prescription medication, including details on how Dexilant works and what side effects may occur.
  • Dexilant Overdose
    This eMedTV article discusses the potential problems that can result from a Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) overdose. This resource explains why it is difficult to predict the effects of this type of overdose and describes treatment options that are available.
  • Dexilant Side Effects
    Diarrhea, nausea, and gas are some of the potential side effects of Dexilant. This eMedTV resource provides an overview of other possible side effects, listing common ones as well as potentially serious reactions that may require prompt medical care.
  • Dexilant Uses
    If you have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), your doctor may prescribe Dexilant. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works to treat GERD and other conditions caused by too much stomach acid. This page also lists off-label Dexilant uses.
  • Dexilant Warnings and Precautions
    As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, you may not be able to take Dexilant if you have certain medical conditions, such as liver disease. This article lists other important warnings and precautions to be aware of before using Dexilant.
  • More About Diet for GERD
    Eating heart-healthy and avoiding foods that trigger symptoms are important parts of a GERD diet. This eMedTV page describes this eating plan in detail and explains how it helps people control their symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.
  • Diet for GERD Patients
    This eMedTV Web page discusses how people who change their eating habits often experience fewer symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This page provides a brief overview of the diet for GERD patients and lists several foods to avoid.
  • Diet for GERDS
    This eMedTV article offers tips on what to eat and what not to eat when you have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This article also links to more information on the topic. The "diet for GERDS" is more commonly known as the "GERD diet."
  • Diet for Gurd
    This article from the eMedTV archives explains the importance of following a diet for GERD, describes the main components of this diet, and lists certain foods you should avoid during treatment. Diet for gurd is a common misspelling of diet for GERD.
  • Does Artichoke Leaf Extract Work?
    Artichoke leaf extract is claimed to treat several conditions, but does artichoke leaf extract work? As this eMedTV Web page explains, some research has shown that the extract may have some effective uses, such as treating IBS and heartburn.
  • Does Curcumin Work?
    This part of the eMedTV archives addresses the question, "Does curcumin work?" Although more research is needed, some studies have shown that curcumin may be effective at treating cholesterol, indigestion, some cancers, and rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Does Licorice Work?
    This selection from the eMedTV library addresses the question, "Does licorice work?" This article explains how licorice may be effective for treating several health conditions, such as heart problems, stomach problems, eczema, and hepatitis.
  • Does Neem Work?
    Neem supplements are very popular, but some people may wonder, "Does neem work?" This part of the eMedTV library explores the answer to this question and discusses the effectiveness of neem for various medical conditions.
  • Does Turmeric Work?
    Turmeric supposedly helps with several health conditions, but does turmeric work? This portion of the eMedTV archives addresses this question and describes the research that has been conducted on the effectiveness of turmeric for several uses.
  • Doing Nothing for GERD
    If you do nothing for your GERD, this video segment explains what you can expect.
  • Drug Interactions With Cimetidine
    Drug interactions with cimetidine may occur when it is taken with medicines such as Valium or Nizoral. This eMedTV article explores drug interactions involving cimetidine and the potential effects of such interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Famotidine
    Itraconazole and atazanavir are among the drugs that can potentially interact with famotidine. This eMedTV page explains how drug interactions with famotidine can decrease the absorption of some drugs in your body, perhaps making them less effective.
  • Drug Interactions With Nizatidine
    Aspirin and atazanavir are among the medicines that may cause drug interactions with nizatidine. This eMedTV page describes how nizatidine drug interactions can make some drugs less effective or raise your risk of side effects, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Sucralfate
    This eMedTV page explains that when certain medicines, such as warfarin, digoxin, or tetracyclines, are taken with sucralfate, drug interactions can occur. This page lists other possible interactions and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Factors that Contribute to GERD -- Hiatal Hernia
    A hiatal hernia can often accompany GERD, as this video clip explains.
  • Factors that Contribute to GERD -- Dietary Factors
    This video explains that certain foods can either increase your likelihood of developing GERD, or they can make your symptoms worse.
  • Factors that Contribute to GERD -- Pregnancy
    Pregnancy-induced GERD may occur, or your existing symptoms may get worse, as this video clip explains.
  • Factors that Contribute to GERD -- Use of Tobacco Products
    Tobacco products can affect the GERD symptoms a person experiences, as this video clip explains.
  • Famotadine
    Famotidine is a medication that works to reduce the amount of acid produced by the stomach. This eMedTV article discusses the drug's effects, when and how to take it, and possible side effects. Famotadine is a common misspelling of famotidine.
  • Famotidin
    Famotidine is approved to treat conditions affecting the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Famotidin is a common misspelling of famotidine.
  • Famotidine
    Famotidine is an H2 blocker commonly used to treat heartburn, GERD, ulcers, and other digestive conditions. This eMedTV article provides a detailed look at the medication, including how it works, dosing information, and available strengths and forms.
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