GERD Articles A-Z

Prilosec Medicine - Smoking and GERD

This page contains links to eMedTV GERD Articles containing information on subjects from Prilosec Medicine to Smoking and GERD. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Prilosec Medicine
    If you have a duodenal ulcer or GERD, your doctor may recommend a medicine called Prilosec. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of this drug, with information on what else it can be used for and what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Prilosec Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, Nexium oral capsules and oral suspension are often recommended to treat several conditions involving the stomach, esophagus, or intestines. This page explains how this drug works and lists possible side effects.
  • Prilosec OT
    Non-prescription Prilosec OTC can be used by adults who have frequent heartburn. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Prilosec OTC, describing how the drug works and listing possible side effects. Prilosec OT is a common misspelling of Prilosec OTC.
  • Prilosec OTC
    Prilosec OTC is non-prescription medication used to treat frequent heartburn in adults. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works to reduce acid in the stomach and provides information on when and how to take it, side effects, and more.
  • Prilosec Overdose
    Symptoms of a Prilosec overdose may include an increased heart rate, confusion, blurred vision, and nausea. This eMedTV segment discusses these and other possible effects of overdosing on Prilosec, and explains how a Prilosec overdose is treated.
  • Prilosec Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using Prilosec may include headaches, diarrhea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web segment describes other Prilosec risks, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Prilosec Side Affects
    Headaches, dizziness, and diarrhea are a few of the common side effects reported with Prilosec. This eMedTV page also lists which side effects may need immediate medical attention. Prilosec side affects is a common misspelling of Prilosec side effects.
  • Prilosec Side Effcts
    Among the Prilosec side effects listed in this eMedTV article are common side effects (like headaches and dizziness) and side effects to report to your doctor (like depression). Prilosec side effcts is a common misspelling of Prilosec side effects.
  • Prilosec Side Effects
    For people taking Prilosec, side effects can include things such as headaches, diarrhea, and back pain. This eMedTV page describes the common and rare side effects of Prilosec, and explains which side effects may require immediate medical attention.
  • Prilosec Substitute
    If you have side effects or if Prilosec is not working for you, there are several alternatives available. This eMedTV Web resource describes several Prilosec substitutes, such as other medications, lifestyle changes, and surgery.
  • Prilosec Uses
    Prilosec uses include the treatment of several conditions of the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This eMedTV resource discusses the specific uses in more detail and also explains an off-label use of Prilosec to prevent ulcers due to NSAIDs.
  • Prilosec vs. Nexium
    What is the difference between Prilosec vs. Nexium? As this part of the eMedTV archives explains, although Prilosec and Nexium are similar chemically, there are important differences and they are not approved for all of the same uses.
  • Prilosec Warnings and Precautions
    Prilosec is generally not recommended for people who have severe liver problems. This eMedTV page highlights other Prilosec warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking the drug when pregnant or breastfeeding and potential drug interactions.
  • PrilosecOTC
    Used to treat frequent heartburn, Prilosec OTC can be purchased without a prescription. This eMedTV segment explains how this over-the-counter medication works and highlights some precautions. PrilosecOTC is a common misspelling of Prilosec OTC.
  • Prilosic
    Prilosec is a prescription drug approved to treat GERD, ulcers, and H. pylori infections. This eMedTV page covers other Prilosec uses, explains how the drug works, and lists its potential side effects. Prilosic is a common misspelling of Prilosec.
  • Prilosic OTC
    If you have heartburn at least twice a week, you can try taking Prilosec OTC. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this drug and explains how it works to reduce stomach acid production. Prilosic OTC is a common misspelling of Prilosec OTC.
  • Priolsec
    This eMedTV segment describes how Prilosec can treat several conditions involving the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This page also explains what to tell your healthcare provider before using this drug. Priolsec is a common misspelling of Prilosec.
  • Problems With Prevacid
    Some of the potential problems with Prevacid may include diarrhea, nausea, and stomach pain. This page from the eMedTV Web library describes other Prevacid problems, including details on who may not be able to safely use this medication.
  • Problems With Prilosec
    Some of the potential problems with Prilosec may include headaches, diarrhea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible problems, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Problems With Zantac
    As with any medication, it is possible to develop problems with Zantac. As this eMedTV resource explains, common side effects include nausea, headache, and vomiting. Potentially serious side effects of Zantac are also included.
  • Prolosec
    Prilosec is used to treat ulcers and conditions related to the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This eMedTV segment lists other Prilosec uses and explains what to tell your doctor before using the drug. Prolosec is a common misspelling of Prilosec.
  • Proteinex
    This eMedTV page explains that Protonix is used to treat several conditions of the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This page also covers potential side effects and general dosing guidelines. Proteinex is a common misspelling of Protonix.
  • Protenix
    This eMedTV article explains how Protonix works to treat several conditions involving the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This Web page also describes the factors that may affect your Protonix dosage. Protenix is a common misspelling of Protonix.
  • Protonex
    This eMedTV page features a brief overview of Protonix, a prescription drug used to treat several conditions, such as GERD and erosive esophagitis. This page also offers a link to more detailed information. Protonex is a common misspelling of Protonix.
  • Protonic
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a healthcare provider may prescribe Protonix to help treat conditions that result from excess stomach acid. This page also covers dosing guidelines and general precautions. Protonic is a common misspelling of Protonix.
  • Protonics
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of Protonix, a drug prescribed to treat several conditions involving the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This page also covers some general precautions of the drug. Protonics is a common misspelling of Protonix.
  • Protonix
    Protonix is a drug used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions. This eMedTV article offers an overview of Protonix, including information about how it reduces stomach acid, and links to additional resources.
  • Protonix 20 mg Tablets
    The tablet form of Protonix comes in two strengths (20 mg Protonix tablets and 40 mg Protonix tablets). As this eMedTV Web page explains, the usual recommended Protonix dosage for the treatment of GERD is 40 mg once daily for up to eight weeks.
  • Protonix 40 mg Tablets
    People with GERD typically take 40 mg Protonix tablets for eight weeks. This eMedTV resource also provides Protonix dosing guidelines for people with GERD who also have erosive esophagitis and for people with pathological hypersecretory conditions.
  • Protonix Alternatives
    If you develop Protonix side effects or do not respond well, alternatives to Protonix are available. This eMedTV segment includes a list of the five major classes of medications that are often recommended for the treatment of GERD.
  • Protonix Dosing
    The recommended starting dose of Protonix for people with excess acid production is 40 mg twice daily. This eMedTV resource also discusses the recommended dosage for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms.
  • Protonix Drug Interactions
    Warfarin is just one of the drugs that may interact with Protonix. This eMedTV resource discusses these and other potential interactions, such as those involving ampicillin esters, and describes the problems that could occur as a result.
  • Protonix for Acid Reflux
    People primarily use Protonix for acid reflux, but the drug is approved for other uses as well. This eMedTV article explores other Protonix uses, lists the effects of this drug, and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment.
  • Protonix for Heartburn
    Healthcare providers often treat heartburn with Protonix. This article from the eMedTV archives further explores the effects of Protonix, describes how the drug works, and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using the medicine.
  • Protonix Medication
    Protonix is prescribed to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of Protonix, including details on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting the medication.
  • Protonix Medication
    This eMedTV page talks about Protonix, a medication that is used to treat GERD. This portion of the Web site offers a more in-depth look at Protonix and its other uses, effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Protonix Medication for GERD
    A prescription medicine, Protonix is used to treat GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). This segment from the eMedTV library explains what else Protonix is used for, describes the effects of this medicine, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Protonix Oral
    Protonix is a medication that is available as oral granule packets and tablets. As this eMedTV page explains, Protonix is a prescription drug approved to treat GERD and other conditions affecting the esophagus, stomach, and intestines.
  • Protonix Precautions and Warnings
    Protonix precautions and warnings include being aware of the risk for developing a vitamin B12 deficiency. This eMedTV segment discusses other precautions and warnings for Protonix users, such as not nursing while taking the medication.
  • Protonix Side Effects
    In people taking Protonix, side effects may include headache, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. This eMedTV segment identifies common and rare side effects associated with Protonix, which range from mild to severe.
  • Protonix Substitute
    You may want to consider a substitute for Protonix if you do not respond well to the medication. As this eMedTV article explains, there are many Protonix alternatives, including other proton pump inhibitors, antacids, foaming agents, and H2 blockers.
  • Provacid
    Prevacid is a prescription drug approved to treat GERD, erosive esophagitis, and other conditions. This eMedTV article covers other uses for this medication and explains how it works for these conditions. Provacid is a common misspelling of Prevacid.
  • Prylosec
    Prilosec is a prescription drug used to treat conditions of the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This eMedTV page explains how the medicine works and lists the factors that can affect your dosage. Prylosec is a common misspelling of Prilosec.
  • Raglan
    Reglan is a prescription drug used for treating GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV article describes how Reglan works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Raglan is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regalan
    Reglan is a GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) medication that is available by prescription. This eMedTV article explains what else this drug is used for and lists side effects that may occur. Regalan is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regalen
    Symptoms of GERD and diabetic gastroparesis can be treated with the prescription drug Reglan. This eMedTV page briefly describes the effects of Reglan and links to more information about the medication. Regalen is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Reglan
    Reglan is a medication that can be prescribed to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV Web page explains how Reglan works for these conditions, offers dosing guidelines for the drug, and lists potential side effects that may occur.
  • Reglan and Breastfeeding
    Reglan (metoclopramide) is known to pass through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV article includes more information on Reglan and breastfeeding, and explores some of the benefits and risks of using this drug while breastfeeding.
  • Reglan and Pregnancy
    Animal and human studies suggest that Reglan (metoclopramide) is probably safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Reglan and pregnancy, and explains how the drug may be used off-label to treat morning sickness.
  • Reglan Dosage
    For the treatment of GERD, the usual recommended Reglan dosage is 10 or 15 mg four times daily. This eMedTV resource also offers Reglan dosing guidelines for diabetic gastroparesis treatment and offers tips for using this medication.
  • Reglan Interactions
    Antipsychotics, digoxin, and cyclosporine are drugs that may cause negative Reglan interactions. This eMedTV article explains what may happen if these drugs are combined with Reglan and lists other medications that may cause an interaction.
  • Reglan Medication Information
    Reglan is a prescription medicine used to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on Reglan, including side effects of the medication, safety warnings, and available forms.
  • Reglan Overdose
    A Reglan (metoclopramide) overdose may cause drowsiness or disorientation. This section of the eMedTV Web site describes other potential effects of a Reglan overdose and lists various treatment options that are available.
  • Reglan Side Effects
    Potential Reglan side effects include diarrhea, loss of bladder control, and nausea. As this eMedTV page explains, while most side effects are mild, some require medical attention. Notify your doctor if you experience a high fever, wheezing, or hives.
  • Reglan Uses
    Reglan is used for the short-term treatment of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This article from the eMedTV site describes how the drug works for these conditions, lists off-label Reglan uses, and explores the risks of using the medicine in children.
  • Reglan Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Reglan if you have epilepsy or seizures. This eMedTV resource includes more information on who should not use Reglan. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with the drug are also listed in this article.
  • Reglen
    Reglan is a medication used for treating the symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Reglan and lists potential side effects of this drug. Reglen is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Reglin
    Reglan is a medication that is available by prescription to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of Reglan and explains what forms the drug comes in. Reglin is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regulan
    Reglan is a prescription medicine approved to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV Web page covers other Reglan uses and explains what you should be aware of before using this drug. Regulan is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regulon
    Reglan is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV page explains how Reglan works and lists potential side effects of the drug. Regulon is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Severe GERD Symptoms
    Shortness of breath, hoarse voice, and bleeding in the esophagus are examples of severe GERD symptoms. As this eMedTV page explains, untreated GERD can lead to more serious symptoms. This page gives an overview of signs and symptoms of severe GERD.
  • Side Effects of Axid
    Common side effects of Axid may include dizziness, headaches, and sore throat. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare side effects (such as anemia) and serious reactions you should to report to your doctor, like symptoms of liver problems or hepatitis.
  • Side Effects of Nizatidine
    Some of the most common side effects of nizatidine include headaches, pain, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment lists other possible nizatidine side effects, including serious problems to report to your doctor and rare but possible side effects.
  • Signs of GERD
    Chest pain, bad breath, and coughing are common signs of GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). This eMedTV segment provides a complete overview of GERD symptoms and explains the difference between heartburn and GERD.
  • Smoking and GERD
    If you smoke, you have a higher risk of GERD. This page of the eMedTV archives explains how smoking can lead to GERD and make symptoms worse in people who already have it. This page also provides basic information about smoking and GERD.
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