GERD Articles A-Z

Substitute for Zantac - What Is Prevacid Used For?

This page contains links to eMedTV GERD Articles containing information on subjects from Substitute for Zantac to What Is Prevacid Used For?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Substitute for Zantac
    An antacid, H2 blocker, or proton pump inhibitor may be a suitable substitute for Zantac. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses these possible alternatives for Zantac, as well as lifestyle changes and surgical alternatives to taking Zantac.
  • Sucralfate
    Available by prescription, sucralfate is a medication used to treat duodenal ulcers. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on how it works, tips for when and how to use it, and potential side effects.
  • Sucralfate and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if sucralfate (Carafate) passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses breastfeeding and sucralfate in more detail, describing why it is probably unlikely that this medication would pass through breast milk.
  • Sucralfate and Pregnancy
    It is probably safe for pregnant women to take sucralfate (Carafate). This eMedTV selection contains more details on the safety of sucralfate in women who are expecting, including the FDA's recommendation and the results of animal studies on the drug.
  • Sucralfate Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the standard recommended sucralfate dosage for treating duodenal ulcers in adults is 1 gram four times daily. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists some tips that can help ensure a safe treatment process.
  • Sucralfate Drug Information
    Sucralfate is a medication that is available by prescription to treat duodenal ulcers. This article on the eMedTV site contains more drug information on sucralfate and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting this medicine.
  • Sucralfate Overdose
    It is not known exactly what to expect if you take too much sucralfate (Carafate). This eMedTV Web article talks about what happened when large doses were given in animal studies and explains the likely treatment options for a sucralfate overdose.
  • Sucralfate Side Effects
    Constipation, nausea, and drowsiness are some of the common side effects that can occur with sucralfate. This eMedTV Web article describes other possible side effects of the medication and explains when you should contact your healthcare provider.
  • Sulcrafate
    If you have duodenal ulcers, your doctor may prescribe sucralfate. This page from the eMedTV Web site further explores this medicine, including information on its possible benefits and side effects. Sulcrafate is a common misspelling of sucralfate.
  • Surgery for GERD
    As a treatment for GERD, surgery usually involves strengthening the LES to reduce acid reflux. This eMedTV segment explains the different surgical procedures that can help people who have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
  • Symptoms of GERD
    Heartburn and chest pain are common symptoms of GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). This page of the eMedTV Web site provides a list of common GERD signs and symptoms, and also includes a link to more in-depth information on the topic.
  • Tagament
    Tagamet is a drug licensed to treat various conditions related to the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This eMedTV resource lists specific uses of both prescription and non-prescription versions. Tagament is a common misspelling of Tagamet.
  • Tagament HB
    Tagamet is used for treating heartburn, ulcers, and other conditions. This eMedTV page covers other Tagamet uses and lists possible side effects of the drug. Tagament HB is a common misspelling of Tagamet HB, the non-prescription version of Tagamet.
  • Tagamet
    Tagamet is a drug that is used to treat conditions related to the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This eMedTV article features an overview of Tagamet, including information on how to take the drug and some of the side effects it may cause.
  • Tagamet Dosage
    When used to treat duodenal ulcers, the Tagamet dosage is generally 800 mg taken at bedtime. This eMedTV article covers dosing for this drug for a variety of conditions, including gastric ulcers, heartburn, and gastroesophageal reflux disease.
  • Tagamet Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about Tagamet? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this drug, with details on specific conditions it can treat, how often it is taken, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Tagamet Drug Interactions
    Examples of drugs that may interact with Tagamet include warfarin, propranolol, and ketoconazole. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at some Tagamet drug interactions and explains the potential effects of such interactions.
  • Tagamet Side Effects
    Some common side effects reported with Tagamet include headaches, drowsiness, dizziness, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment identifies both common and rare side effects, including those that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Tagamet Uses
    Uses of Tagamet include the treatment of gastric ulcers, heartburn, GERD, and other conditions. This eMedTV page explores Tagamet uses, including some "off-label" uses, such as treating warts and preventing acid-related pneumonia during surgeries.
  • Tagamet Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page highlights some Tagamet warnings and precautions to be aware of, such as those concerning proper dosages for people with kidney problems. This article also lists conditions you should notify your doctor about before taking the drug.
  • Tagemet
    Tagamet is a drug that may be used to treat heartburn, ulcers, GERD, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of Tagamet and provides a link to more information. Tagemet is a common misspelling of Tagamet.
  • Taking Zantac While Pregnant
    Taking Zantac while pregnant doesn't appear to harm the fetus, but as this eMedTV Web page explains, a doctor will recommend Zantac only if he or she believes that the benefits to the pregnant woman outweigh any possible risks to the unborn child.
  • Termaric
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that turmeric supposedly helps to treat several conditions, such as depression, heartburn, and cancer. This page also describes some general precautions. Termaric is a common misspelling of turmeric.
  • Termeric
    Turmeric may have medicinal uses, such as anti-inflammatory effects and preventing blood clots. This eMedTV page covers what to tell your doctor before using turmeric and offers a link to more information. Termeric is a common misspelling of turmeric.
  • Termuric
    Using turmeric medicinally may help with several health conditions, such as depression and heartburn. This eMedTV segment discusses other potential benefits of turmeric, as well as possible side effects. Termuric is a common misspelling of turmeric.
  • Treating GERD in Infants
    This page of the eMedTV library examines in detail methods of treating GERD in infants. Sleeping and feeding modifications are often the first step; other treatment options include medications and, in rare cases, surgery.
  • Treatment for GERD
    As this eMedTV article explains, GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease) treatment can involve diet and lifestyle changes, medication, and surgery. This page describes each option and provides a link to more information on treating this condition.
  • Treatment Options for GERD
    GERD treatment can include lifestyle changes, medication, or even surgery. This eMedTV page covers these options for treating GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). Most people are able to control their symptoms by using a combination of these methods.
  • Tumeric
    Turmeric is claimed to help with several conditions, such as depression, indigestion, and cancer. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of turmeric, including possible side effects and safety concerns. Tumeric is a common misspelling of turmeric.
  • Tumeric Side Effects
    Some common side effects of turmeric include nausea and diarrhea. This portion of the eMedTV Web library also covers which side effects may require prompt medical care. Tumeric side effects is a common misspelling of turmeric side effects.
  • Turmeric
    Some people may use turmeric medicinally to help with depression and heartburn, among other conditions. This eMedTV article lists other turmeric uses, explores the effectiveness of the spice, and offers important safety warnings and precautions.
  • Turmeric and Breastfeeding
    It's unknown if using turmeric is safe for women who are breastfeeding. Turmeric, as this eMedTV page explains, hasn't been studied in clinical trials, and it is not known if it passes through breast milk or would cause problems in a nursing infant.
  • Turmeric and Pregnancy
    It is not known if using turmeric is safe during pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV Web site contains more information on turmeric and pregnancy, and explains why using turmeric medicinally may potentially cause problems during pregnancy.
  • Turmeric Dosage
    There is little information available about the safest and most effective turmeric dosage. This eMedTV resource explains why there are no established turmeric dosing guidelines and provides some dosing information based on preliminary research.
  • Turmeric Drug Interactions
    Certain medications that "thin" the blood could cause turmeric drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists specific anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs that may interact with turmeric and describes the negative effects of these interactions.
  • Turmeric Overdose
    A turmeric overdose may increase the risk of bleeding (including dangerous internal bleeding). This eMedTV Web article discusses the factors that may affect an overdose on turmeric and describes possible treatment options that are available.
  • Turmeric Side Effects
    Potential side effects of turmeric include nausea and diarrhea. This article from the eMedTV Web library lists other possible side effects of this product. Potentially serious side effects are also included in this article.
  • Turmeric Supplement Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses the supplement turmeric. It explains what turmeric is, why people take it, and how to ensure your safety if you decide to take it medicinally. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Unlabeled Uses of Cytotec
    Causing an abortion and inducing labor are possible unlabeled uses for Cytotec. This eMedTV page explains what an unlabeled use is and when a healthcare provider may prescribe this drug for these purposes. A link to more details is also included.
  • What Are H2 Blockers?
    Zantac, Tagamet, and Pepcid are all examples of H2 blockers. This eMedTV segment gives an explanation of what H2 blockers are used for, how they work, and more. Also included is a link to more detailed information.
  • What Are the Symptoms of GERD?
    There are many symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the most common is heartburn. This eMedTV article lists other signs and symptoms (such as sore throat, coughing, and bad breath) and provides a link to more information.
  • What Are the Symptoms of GERD?
    This video clip describes several possible symptoms of GERD.
  • What Happens When You Have GERD?
    This interactive video explains what happens when you have GERD.
  • What Is Aciphex Used For?
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, Aciphex is used to treat duodenal ulcers, erosive esophagitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and other conditions. This article provides an overview of these uses.
  • What Is Cimetidine Used For?
    What is cimetidine used for? As explained in this eMedTV segment, prescription cimetidine is used for treating conditions such as gastric ulcers and GERD. Over-the-counter cimetidine is used to treat heartburn and similar conditions.
  • What Is Cytotec?
    Cytotec is given to people who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and are at risk for ulcers. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at what Cytotec is and how it works. It also offers a link to more information on this prescription drug.
  • What Is Famotidine Used For?
    What is famotidine used for? As this eMedTV Web page explains, famotidine is used to treat ulcers, GERD, and other conditions related to the esophagus, stomach, and intestines. This page provides a detailed look at these famotidine uses.
  • What Is GERD?
    This eMedTV article explains that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which stomach acid comes back up the esophagus and damages it. This page also discusses the causes, symptoms, and treatment options available.
  • What Is Gurd?
    What is GERD? As this eMedTV resource explains, GERD is a condition characterized by heartburn and other symptoms. This article describes the condition in more detail and explains why it occurs. What is gurd is a common misspelling of what is GERD.
  • What Is Nizatidine Used For?
    What is nizatidine used for? As this eMedTV resource explains, prescription nizatidine is used for treating duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and GERD. Over-the-counter nizatidine can be used to treat acid indigestion, sour stomach, and heartburn.
  • What Is Prevacid Used For?
    What is Prevacid used for? As explained in this eMedTV article, because it reduces the amount of acid in the stomach, Prevacid is used to treat conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and pathological hypersecretory diseases.
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